• Mike Sturm

The Street Slang: Carry Less, Travel More


Hyphenate’s first product, the Street-Slang, is a bag by travelers for travelers. It is intentionally designed to comfortably fit your phone, wallet, a journal, book, and writing utensils neatly. The 3.5L capacity allows you to carry almost everything you would consider essential, yet it’s small enough to encourage you to choose what you carry wisely. The design is minimal to blend in with your environment, functional enough to be useful, and stylish enough to go with most outfits or occasions. The Street Slang was intentionally designed to not fit large items so you can fully experience your destination.


At Hyphenate, we believe that life unfolds in decisions and trade-offs, especially when you’re traveling. In the beginning, you decide where you will go, whether it be somewhere in your neighborhood, somewhere a bit further, or somewhere far away and totally new. Then you’ll need to figure out what to bring in your luggage or suitcase. Usually you will overpack because of that “just in case” mindset—and that’s totally fine. And when you’ve finally arrived at your destination and you’ve unloaded and unpacked your stuff, what do you really need to bring everything with you to maximize your travel experience? If your goal is to bring something back from the places you visit, it’s best not to bring too much with you.


The art of knowing exactly what you will need for the day and traveling light gets more refined as you travel more. Carrying a little less than you think you need can free you from the limitations of being a tourist, and emboldens you as a traveler. As a tourist, time is spent mostly on keeping up with an itinerary and checking things off the list. However, as a traveler we seek to learn, experience, and connect with a new place and new people. We become a part of the place we are traveling to, and inevitably let that place become a part of us. The tourist’s trip is structured and compartmented, while the traveler’s journey unfolds organically. The tourist’s trip happens inside of the box, whereas the traveler’s journey happens largely outside of it.



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